Prints Charming – Marimekko from Paper to Print

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A true Marimekko fan is always looking for more insider information on their favorites prints and patterns. If you’re like me, you get a little giddy when new photos are released of the techniques used to make these great textiles transition from paper sketches to fabric.

What’s unique about Marimekko’s use of color? It’s the chemistry between their designers and production. Lots of listening. Lots of learning. Even the occasional social drink together after a hard day of printing. In other words— plenty of dyed-in-Marimekko spirit.

Sounds simple, yeah? Take a look at these photos and see for yourself just how complicated a process it is to make your favorite Marimekko patterns come to life.

Jurmo screen ready to go.

Freshly printed Jurmo fabric

After a few uses and cleanings, the screen’s blocking agent (which keeps the ink from seeping through the screen where the pattern doesn’t need it) can wear out. Technicians paint the screens with fresh filler to get the most use out of them.

After each run, leftover ink must be cleaned out of the screen so that it doesn’t dry and block the holes – or so another color may be used in another run.

How does it work? The designer chooses the right colors for the pattern, after which the printing team prepares color recipes and printing screens. There is no room for error as the dye must fix firmly to the cotton fiber. A test sample is then printed and tested repeatedly depending on the pattern and color selection. When all the colors are right, final printing can begin.

 

Choosing the right colors for the right print is a daunting task.

Once the right colors are picked, the ink must be mixed for each individual color in the print.

More color mixing.

Mixed ink is stored in canisters.

Production

Doesn’t seeing all of the hard work and dye put into production make you love Marimekko all the more? AlwaysMod has a wide selection of Marimekko Fabrics to choose from, and each was made with this time-consuming, labor-of-love ethic that you see above.

 

[all photos from the Marimekko newsletter]

 

2 Responses

  1. Cyn | decyng

    08/30/2012, 06:08 pm

    Amazing to see the whole process. I really admire Marimekko prints!

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